Review: Umbrella Corps

More like Resident Evil’s corpse.

Did you know that Umbrella Corps released on PS4 and PC recently? If not, I don’t blame you as it released with no marketing or fanfare, and after playing it I can see why: It sucks. I think Capcom knew it was bad early on, hence why the Resident Evil branding is nowhere to be found in the game—even the iconic rumbling voice saying “Resident Evil” has been replaced with a woman simply saying “Umbrella” without much passion. I guess it would have been more expensive to have her say the full game’s title, and Capcom clearly wanted to cut its losses.

The easiest way to describe Umbrella Corps is a frantic arcade multiplayer third-person shooter that feels closer to something that should have been free-to-play instead of being offered for $30. Playing as a generic gas-masked guy with a few different guns, you’ll be running around zombie-filled locations based on the Resident Evil franchise in one of three modes. You can unlock various other boring black gas masks for your character, as well as other customization options, all of which are equally dull.

Read my full review of Umbrella Corps here.

Checkout some footage from the game below:

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Review: Omnibus

If Speed attempted to be a dank meme and failed.

OmniBus is one of those games made for the Twitch streamers and YouTubers who overreact to everything. The game has purposefully broken physics meant to be funny but instead ends up negatively impacting the gameplay, unlike games such as Goat Simulator and QWOP that pull this feat off.

The story mode has you playing as OmniBus, a personified superhero bus. There isn’t much story to be had aside from brief dialogues at the start and end of each level which mostly consist of telling you your objective and thanking you for completing it. But no one is buying this game for the story in the first place.

Read my full review here.

Review: On Rusty Trails

You play as Elvis, whose house is destroyed, so he sets out on a dangerous platforming adventure to get a new one via his warranty. Along the way Elvis walks right through the middle of a race war between his people, the red triangles, and their neighbors, the blue monsters.

Over across 100 levels, you hop between platforms which you stick to as if magnetically, allowing you to run around all sides without fear of falling. Elvis acquires a blue-monster disguise early on that allows him to jump on blue areas that would otherwise disappear when he approaches. Inversely, red spaces can’t be used when in the disguise. Even the stages themselves are ‘racist’ in this game. Luckily, you can instantly switch between colors on the fly with the press of a button.

Check out my full review here.

Review: Time Machine VR (VR)

Growing up I always wanted to be a paleontologist because I was obsessed with dinosaurs. Instead, here I am a lowly game critic, but every cloud has its silver lining, mine being that I get to review all the video games with dinosaurs in them—like this one. If only this game were good.

Time Machine VR has you traveling back to the times when dinosaurs were still alive and researching their behaviors in hopes of finding a cure for an ancient virus unleashed from the melting ice caps. The story is told through full-motion video sequences and voiceovers from your AI guide. Flat FMVs inside of a VR game is just an odd choice considering video can now be recorded specifically for VR, but I suppose it makes sense if in the future we are still using flat screens. Regardless, the story isn’t all that interesting nor all that important.

Read the full review at Game Revolution.