Review: Seasons after Fall

A young girl’s voice tells you, a seed, to possess a fox and explore a forest to find the guardians of the seasons. Finding them will grant players the power to swap between seasons on the fly.

That is the basic premise of Seasons after Fall‘s story, which as you can imagine makes little sense, as the reasoning behind everything is never fully explained—at least as far as character motivations are concerned. At least there’s a clear conclusion.

The story isn’t why you’ll want to play this though, the wonderful art style, animations, and calming gameplay is.

Read my full review here.

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Review: Hue

Limbow.

A young boy named Hue goes in search of his mother who has gone missing. Along the way, he discovers the ability to change the color of the world around him which makes objects of the same color disappear, and thus Hue can walk through where they were as if they don’t exist.

Swapping colors with a color wheel via the right stick, basic platforming, and moving around some boxes are the only interactions you’ll have playing Hue. While simplicity isn’t a bad thing, a majority of the game’s puzzles are far too easy as they consist of just being able to recognize colors, swapping to the intended color, and then proceeding. Only around the last 10% of the game’s puzzles required any thought or skill on my part, and I don’t exactly consider myself a brainiac. As it only took me around three hours to finish this, I was left disappointed with the lack of challenge.

Read my full review here.

Review: Batman – The Telltale Series: Episode 1 Realm of Shadows

Bruce Wayne has always been the best part of Batman

I’ve never been big into superhero movies, as they mostly focus on action and special effects, forgetting that the characters in tight suits should have, you know, emotions. The character building segments are always better than the fights in between, just like professional wrestling.

If you’re a Bruce Wayne fan, you’re in luck, as it seems like the developers at Telltale know this. All the best parts of this first episode happen outside of the suit.

Starting out, Batman slowly enters the scene as fitting music plays (though it is no Danny Elfman composition) and then there is a series of what appear to be quick time events, which have been welcome additions to video games exactly zero times.

Read my first review for Zam here!

Review: Quadrilateral Cowboy

If Wes Anderson made a hacking game…

I’m typically wary of any title that features any type of hacking or coding, as they tend to be monotonous, but I’m so very glad I didn’t pass up on Quadrilateral Cowboy. This adventure centers around a group of three women in the 1980s as they take various jobs hacking and stealing information.

The jobs start simple enough, only requiring connecting your devices to ports and pressing open, before quickly adding in coding, controlling robots, and even jump pads that launch you across the air. You’ll be hacking in apartments, skyscrapers, and even in space. No two levels feel alike, which kept the experience feeling fresh from start to finish, which took me about five hours total.

If you’ve ever played Blendo Games other adventure game, Thirty Flights of Loving, then you’ll quickly recognize the same boxy yet attractive art style, and hip Wes Anderson-like characters and color schemes, only this time mixed with lots of hacking. The hacking is done somewhat realistically via using various programs on a portable computer such as telnet and even remote control robots, though calling it hacking is a stretch as it is bit closer to basic coding, though that isn’t a bad thing.

Read my full review here.

Review: FATED: The Silent Oath (VR)

This virtual reality exclusive takes place during the age of the Vikings and deals mostly with a bit of their mythology. The game starts off with the player character dead and being offered a second chance at life as long as they take an oath of silence, hence the title. From there you’ll have around two hours of slowly pacing around listening to dialogue from other characters that spin a very shallow story.

The developers describe the game as a “narrative experience that focuses on emotion over gameplay” and call the game “movie-length.” At least the developers aren’t directly liars, as the game took around two hours to finish, and there certainly is little in the way of gameplay. The majority of your time will be spent walking or standing still and looking at characters as they deliver their dialogue directly at you or other characters. The only thing that otherwise qualifies as gameplay is a short segment where you’re tasked with shooting a few deer with a bow early in the game, something that you’d think would be foreshadowing using the bow again in the future—but you’d be wrong.

Read the full review at CGM.

Night in the Woods is an adventure game for millennials who shrug at Hot Topic

When I wrote about a non-hipster walking simulator for Cliffy B just before PAX, I had no idea there was already a game that was basically that, only it’s 2D and features colorful animals.

Night in the Woods is a colorful adventure game about a 20-year-old cat named Mae that just moved to her parents’ place after dropping out of college. Mae hopes to reconnect with her old friends and the city she left behind, but quickly finds that nothing stays the same, even after only a couple of short years.

Shrug at my impressions here.

Review: Albino Lullaby: Episode 1

Too many horror games and movies these days rely on jump scares as their only real source of fear. While there is nothing inherently wrong with that, they really are cheap and easy. Recently there has been a resurgence in media of actual horror with notable films such as The Witch and It Follows coming to mind, but games, on the other hand, have mostly stuck to jump scares.

Albino Lullaby doesn’t resort to that. In fact, I’m not sure it has any scares at all. If anything it’s like Tim Burton and David Lynch had sex in a funhouse; amusing to look at and creepy.

Read my full review here.