Review: Umbrella Corps

More like Resident Evil’s corpse.

Did you know that Umbrella Corps released on PS4 and PC recently? If not, I don’t blame you as it released with no marketing or fanfare, and after playing it I can see why: It sucks. I think Capcom knew it was bad early on, hence why the Resident Evil branding is nowhere to be found in the game—even the iconic rumbling voice saying “Resident Evil” has been replaced with a woman simply saying “Umbrella” without much passion. I guess it would have been more expensive to have her say the full game’s title, and Capcom clearly wanted to cut its losses.

The easiest way to describe Umbrella Corps is a frantic arcade multiplayer third-person shooter that feels closer to something that should have been free-to-play instead of being offered for $30. Playing as a generic gas-masked guy with a few different guns, you’ll be running around zombie-filled locations based on the Resident Evil franchise in one of three modes. You can unlock various other boring black gas masks for your character, as well as other customization options, all of which are equally dull.

Read my full review of Umbrella Corps here.

Checkout some footage from the game below:

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Review: Mighty No. 9

As someone who only dabbled in Mega Man games in my childhood, I played both the originals and the X series before digging into the spiritual successor by original character designer Keiji Inafune. I feel like people look at the original series with rose-tinted glasses, as it isn’t that great, or at the very least hasn’t aged well. The X series, on the other hand, is still serviceable and worth picking up if you’re got a hankering for a great retro platformer. Mighty No. 9, on the other hand, you can skip.

This $3.8 million USD crowdfunded platformer falls somewhere in between retro Mega Man and the X series. The graphics and stage layouts are simple like the original games, while dashing makes the game feel a bit like Mega Man X minus the wall jumping.

Read my full review of Mighty No. 9 here.

Checkout my full playthrough below

Review: Anima: Gate of Memories

Nier on a budget

I love Nier, so you can probably imagine I was pretty thrilled to find a $20 game that could pass for its spiritual sequel. While playing I kept thinking, “I’m going to call this the sleeper hit of the year — I can’t believe how great this is” until about the last quarter of the game where bosses start to get a bit too cheap.

While not perfect, for the price, this game is a steal.

Read the full review here.

Review: Edge of Nowhere

For $40, you can experience around three hours of a white guy with a gun battling aliens that can infect humans in Insomniac Games’ VR debut, and no, it isn’t Resistance, but obviously that isn’t a stretch for the developer.

That means you’re paying around $13.33 per hour of gameplay, which quite possibly makes this one of the most expensive games in recent memory on a money per time basis, even beating out The Order: 1886. But is it worth it? If you love John Carpenter’s The Thing, scaling walls in games like Tomb Raider and Uncharted, and the stealth sections of The Last of Us, then maybe.

Read my full review here.

Review: Omnibus

If Speed attempted to be a dank meme and failed.

OmniBus is one of those games made for the Twitch streamers and YouTubers who overreact to everything. The game has purposefully broken physics meant to be funny but instead ends up negatively impacting the gameplay, unlike games such as Goat Simulator and QWOP that pull this feat off.

The story mode has you playing as OmniBus, a personified superhero bus. There isn’t much story to be had aside from brief dialogues at the start and end of each level which mostly consist of telling you your objective and thanking you for completing it. But no one is buying this game for the story in the first place.

Read my full review here.

Review: On Rusty Trails

You play as Elvis, whose house is destroyed, so he sets out on a dangerous platforming adventure to get a new one via his warranty. Along the way Elvis walks right through the middle of a race war between his people, the red triangles, and their neighbors, the blue monsters.

Over across 100 levels, you hop between platforms which you stick to as if magnetically, allowing you to run around all sides without fear of falling. Elvis acquires a blue-monster disguise early on that allows him to jump on blue areas that would otherwise disappear when he approaches. Inversely, red spaces can’t be used when in the disguise. Even the stages themselves are ‘racist’ in this game. Luckily, you can instantly switch between colors on the fly with the press of a button.

Check out my full review here.

Review: Please, Don’t Touch Anything (Oculus Rift)

Take one part MacGyver, one part Alan Turing, one part the hidden pictures section in Highlights, and a whole bunch of pop culture references, mix them in a bowl of virtual reality, and you’ve got Please, Don’t Touch Anything, the Oculus Rift-exclusive VR remake of the game of the same name.

The original was 2D pixel art, had you looking straight ahead, and costs $5, so is the remake worth $15?

Click here to read the full review and find out.

Review: Overwatch

If you haven’t heard of Overwatch, then you’ve probably been living under a rock as it has been marketed and hyped to hell. But does it live up to that hype?

Yes and no. If you are looking for a solid, hero-based multiplayer shooter that is far closer to Team Fortress 2 than the MOBA genre, you’ll probably dig it. However, the levelling system and micro-transactions are setup like a free-to-play game.

Read the full review at CGM.

Review: TMNT: Mutants in Manhatten

Have you ever watched your childhood gun downed in front of you? Because that is what it was like playing Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Mutants in Manhattan. I grew up on the old-school cartoon and movies, had a ton of action figures as a kid, and even had the album put out by the turtles with a post of it over my bed. I also didn’t have many friends.

So you probably wouldn’t be surprised when I say I was looking forward to this game. I mean, who wasn’t? A Turtles game developed by Platinum Games with a groovy comic book art style, how could it go wrong? But wrong it is, oh so wrong.

Read the full review at Game Revolution.

Review: FATED: The Silent Oath (VR)

This virtual reality exclusive takes place during the age of the Vikings and deals mostly with a bit of their mythology. The game starts off with the player character dead and being offered a second chance at life as long as they take an oath of silence, hence the title. From there you’ll have around two hours of slowly pacing around listening to dialogue from other characters that spin a very shallow story.

The developers describe the game as a “narrative experience that focuses on emotion over gameplay” and call the game “movie-length.” At least the developers aren’t directly liars, as the game took around two hours to finish, and there certainly is little in the way of gameplay. The majority of your time will be spent walking or standing still and looking at characters as they deliver their dialogue directly at you or other characters. The only thing that otherwise qualifies as gameplay is a short segment where you’re tasked with shooting a few deer with a bow early in the game, something that you’d think would be foreshadowing using the bow again in the future—but you’d be wrong.

Read the full review at CGM.