JUST THE TIP: Rhythm Heaven Megamix (3DS)

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Review: SteelSeries Rival 700 Mouse

Force feedback in a mouse

As someone who has played first-person shooters on consoles the majority of my life, I’ve only recently attempted to make the switch to mouse and keyboard. This is largely thanks to many PC versions of games being generally better than their console counterparts, but after playing a 16-hour Overwatch session, I realized one feature I missed from using a traditional controller: rumble.

Haptic feedback is something I had grown accustomed to in the console space and relied on heavily, especially since many games are bad at giving you visual cues these days. As it turns out, though, SteelSeries has a mouse for people like me. The Rival 700 features a form of force feedback. The trick is you have to play one of three games that are currently supported by the device.

Read my full review here.

Review: Umbrella Corps

More like Resident Evil’s corpse.

Did you know that Umbrella Corps released on PS4 and PC recently? If not, I don’t blame you as it released with no marketing or fanfare, and after playing it I can see why: It sucks. I think Capcom knew it was bad early on, hence why the Resident Evil branding is nowhere to be found in the game—even the iconic rumbling voice saying “Resident Evil” has been replaced with a woman simply saying “Umbrella” without much passion. I guess it would have been more expensive to have her say the full game’s title, and Capcom clearly wanted to cut its losses.

The easiest way to describe Umbrella Corps is a frantic arcade multiplayer third-person shooter that feels closer to something that should have been free-to-play instead of being offered for $30. Playing as a generic gas-masked guy with a few different guns, you’ll be running around zombie-filled locations based on the Resident Evil franchise in one of three modes. You can unlock various other boring black gas masks for your character, as well as other customization options, all of which are equally dull.

Read my full review of Umbrella Corps here.

Checkout some footage from the game below:

Review: Mighty No. 9

As someone who only dabbled in Mega Man games in my childhood, I played both the originals and the X series before digging into the spiritual successor by original character designer Keiji Inafune. I feel like people look at the original series with rose-tinted glasses, as it isn’t that great, or at the very least hasn’t aged well. The X series, on the other hand, is still serviceable and worth picking up if you’re got a hankering for a great retro platformer. Mighty No. 9, on the other hand, you can skip.

This $3.8 million USD crowdfunded platformer falls somewhere in between retro Mega Man and the X series. The graphics and stage layouts are simple like the original games, while dashing makes the game feel a bit like Mega Man X minus the wall jumping.

Read my full review of Mighty No. 9 here.

Checkout my full playthrough below

Gwent Might End Up Being My New Go-To Card Game

Anyone that knows me well knows that I love Hearthstone, considering I’ve spent at least $300 on card packs and expansions to the game. I’d even guess that it was my most played game in 2015, so for me to say that I think Gwent may be able to pull me away from Blizzard’s juggernaut franchise is a big deal.

First off, let me say that I was never really big into card games prior to Hearthstone. Friends tried to teach me Magic the Gathering and other physical card games, but I could never get into them. I’ve also never played any of the Witcher games, but the same could be said forWarcraft titles. I went into my preview of Gwent with a bit of apprehension, thinking I’d need to have played the series to understand and enjoy it. That, thankfully, wasn’t the case.

Read my full hands-on preview from E3 2016 here.

Under A Month From Launch Song of the Deep Has Major Issues

The submarine exploration game Song of the Deep, developed by Insomniac Games, releases in just a few short weeks and what I played on the E3 show floor has me both interested and concerned.

The premise is simple enough: a girl’s father is lost at sea, so she builds a rickety submarine and sets out to find him. When first starting out she can only navigate the deep waters, but quickly finds an upgrade that allows the sub to pick up items for use in puzzles as well as attack aquatic enemies.

Read my full hands-on preview from E3 2016 here.

Feral Rites is a Colourful Tribal Beat ‘Em Up

“I don’t know, I don’t really worry about it,” said Cameron Christian. This was in response to potential concerns that people may take issue with perceivable cultural appropriation in Insomniac Games’ new Oculus Rift exclusive, Feral Rites. I asked this because the first thing that hit me upon seeing the character selection screen was, “wow, these characters look like white people dressed in tribal garb.” I will concede that screenshots I saw after the fact made the character look less white than I initially thought.

Aside from that, what I played seemed like a serviceable game with combat that is reminiscent of the Arkham series. Players can easily take on multiple enemies at the same time, bouncing between them. With a quick attack, strong attack, and the ability to throw enemies into either each other or deadly needle plants, similar to the ones in Insomniac’s recent Rift exclusive Edge of Nowhere. I jokingly asked if this game takes place in the same universe, and Cameron confirmed that it does not. That still won’t stop me from making it my headcanon, though.

Read my full hands-on impressions from E3 2016 here.